Pediatric ENT

Atlanta ENT understands how parents feel when their children’s ear, nose and throat problems require a specialist’s care. Often, the child’s pediatrician has tried treating the problems, without much long-term success, before referring the family to an otolaryngologist, or ENT physician. If left untreated, common ear, nose and throat disorders can become severe and seriously impact a child’s quality of life. These facts leave most parents feeling frustrated and worried by the time they arrive at our office for help.

We understand the concerns of parents, and also the fears of children. Our team of skilled, friendly nurses and doctors will do everything possible to make you and your children feel comfortable, informed and in control of healthcare decisions.

Atlanta ENT: Pediatric Sinus Problems

Pediatric sinus problems are fairly common, but the symptoms and treatments can vary. Due to their young age, children may not have the same symptoms as adults with the same medical conditions. One of the most common ways that a parent knows there is a problem is by seeing a behavioral change in their child.

Common symptoms of childhood ear, nose and throat problems include:

  • Chronic runny nose
  • Post nasal drip
  • Puffiness around the eyes
  • Frequent discolored nasal drainage
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Worsening of asthma or breathing disorders
  • Chronic strep throat
  • Chronic tonsillitis
  • Hearing problems

If your child’s pediatrician recommends an ear, nose and throat specialist, or if your child has any of the symptoms above, call Atlanta ENT to schedule an appointment today.

Atlanta ENT: Pediatric Hearing Milestones

In the United States, six out of every 1,000 babies are born with permanent hearing loss. Of these, 50 percent have no medical history to place them at a higher-risk than other newborns. Children with hearing loss are not generally fitted with hearing aids until their second birthday, which can cause developmental delays.

The most critical period for speech and language development takes place between birth and age four. Undetected and untreated hearing loss can lead to delayed speech/language development, social problems and academic difficulties.

The milestones below are normal developmental stages related to hearing. If you notice that your child is missing any of these milestones, we recommend visiting us for a pediatric hearing test. Your child is never too young to have a hearing evaluation.

Birth to Three Months

  • Startled by loud sounds
  • Soothed by familiar voices

Three to Six Months

  • Turns eyes to search for location of sound
  • Imitates own noises (“ba-ba” “ooh”, etc.)
  • Notices rattles and other sound making toys

Six to Ten Months

  • Responds to own name
  • Looks around for sources of sounds (dog barking, phone ringing)
  • Understands common words (No, bye-bye)

Ten to Fifteen Months

  • Points to, or looks at, familiar objects or people
  • Imitates simple words and sounds

One to Two Years

  • Uses one and two word phrases
  • Points to body parts or pictures when asked
  • Listens to simple stories and songs